Featuring two new restaurants and a cocktail bar in Shanghai—fine dining recipes in a jar at Popot, neighborhood bar Perch, and contemporary French at Oxalis.


Popot

Address: 406-1 Jianguo Xi Lu, near Yueyang Lu 建国西路406-1, 近岳阳路
Tel: 54488097
Hours: 8am-9pm

Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

Popot is a quaint café in Shanghai that does fine-dining recipes in eco-friendly and sustainable glass jars.

While most of the food is traditional French fare, some dishes have a Southeast Asian twist. (The French consultant chef is based in Thailand.) All recipes are designed to be served in jars and are meant to be eaten with a spoon. It’s a gimmick, but it’s done well.

Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Exotic Pickles in Coconut Marinade (¥38) with lemongrass and dill
Tuna Rillettes at Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Tuna Rillettes (¥48) served with toasted garlic bread
Hummus at Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Popot Hummus (¥58) with a touch of curry
Healthy salads at Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Carrots, Coriander, Citrus (¥48) – Crunchy ribbons of carrot in a fresh, flavorful citrus marinade of garlic, ginger, calamansi, and orange. An absolute favorite.
Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Pork Cheek Confit (¥78) with green vegetables – Pork confit in chicken stock, served with fresh peas. (Portions are larger than they appear!)
Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
On the right: Beef Bourguignon (¥88) – Tender beef with carrots and turnip over mashed potatoes. Also excellent.
Coquillettes at Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Coquillettes (¥58) with ham, cheese, and black truffle – Basically the French mac n cheese, but way better.
Tiramisu (¥38) and Lemon Tart (¥38)
Popot, a cafe in Shanghai serving French food in eco-friendly glass jars. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

It’s comfort food with a fine dining touch. The food is tasty and the price points are great, and I could see myself eating here on a daily basis. Plus, it promotes sustainability for delivery—glass jars can be recycled, or you can bring your used Popot jars and get ¥2 back per pot.

Popot – Definitely would return.

You can also order via their WeChat account: popot博朴


Perch

Address: No. 107, 445 Jiangning Lu, near Wuding Lu 江宁路445号107, 近武定路
Tel:13918628732
Hours: 11am-midnight, closed Mondays

Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

Perch is an easy-going cocktail bar slinging tasty bar snacks in Jing’an. It’s brought to you from (some of) the team behind beloved neighborhood drinking hole The Rooster, who’s looking to expand their boozing demographic to include seekers of G&Ts and finger foods beyond chicken wings. Perch is basically a grown-up Rooster.

Drinks are uncomplicated. Beer on tap, gin and tonics, and simple yet thoroughly enjoyable cocktails are on offer. Food is similarly simple. They just want you to have a good time without breaking the bank.

Drinks at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Double G (¥58) – Beefeater and Peddler’s Gin with grapefruit, elderflower liqueur, and lemon juice. Get a carafe for ¥158.
Drinks at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Ginger Vitus (¥58) – Fresh lemon juice, Sichuan chili, lemongrass, ginger, Absolut vodka, triple sec, passion fruit syrup, egg white.
Soft shell crab at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Soft Shell Crab (¥68) – Japanese short shell crab breaded and gently fried with fresh ginger mayo
Hummus at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Hummus (¥48) peppered with tumeric and served with addictive fried bread.
Bruschetta at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Champignon Mushroom Bruschetta (¥88) topped with balsamic vinegar and parmesan
Bruschetta at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
House-cured Salmon Bruschetta (¥88) with dill and sour cream
Cheese platter at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Cheese Platter (¥98) with gorgonzola, grana padano, and sheep cheese with honey, grapes, and bread.

Perch has great prices—drinks start from ¥45 and bites from ¥25—and they have the same Rooster hospitality. Added bonus: wrap around terrace and venue is dog-friendly

Drinks at Perch, an easy-going neighborhood cocktail bar in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Shanghai Love Mule Draft (¥45)

Promotions!

Perch has a happy hour every Tuesday to Friday from 5-7pm, offering buy-one-get-one free selected drinks.

Plus, they’re also offering free pass around tapas every Tuesday from 5-7pm. #doubledowntuesdays


Oxalis

Address: 4/F, Bldg 2, 388 Shanhaiguan Lu, near Cixi Lu 山海关路388号2座4楼, 近慈溪路
Tel: 63811858
Hours: 11:30am-2pm, 6-9pm

Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk

Oxalis is a contemporary French restaurant that, after a brief hiatus from closing its original location at the Waterhouse hotel, has reopened in the new mall across from the Shanghai Natural History Museum.

Despite its mall locale, the space is gorgeous. It appeals to the conventions of what casual-upscale restaurants should look and feel like.

The food at Oxalis is delicate French cooking with a few localized subtleties integrated into some dishes. It’s casual yet elegant, and has a mix of French, Nordic, and Chinese influences.

Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Foie Gras Terrine (¥128) with apple chutney, pomelo, and brioche.
Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Sourdough Bread (¥18) – Two slices of bread served with brown butter
Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Australian Angus beef tartare (¥168) with 10-year Laphroaig, Indian almonds, Oscietra caviar
Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Squid (¥38) – Two pieces, grilled on a skewer with guanciale, bok choi, green Sichuan pepper
Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Butternut Squash (¥68) as a soup with hazelnut, nutmeg, and gorgonzola, and two pieces of ravioli
Halibut at Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Atlantic Halibut (¥198) with edamame, 20-year shaoxing wine, and mint. One of my favorites from the meal.
Desserts at Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Floating Island (¥58) with vanilla sauce, caramel, hazelnut
Desserts at Oxalis, contemporary French restaurant in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk
Front: French Chestnut (¥68), similar to a Mont Blanc with dark rum, blueberry, and meringue.
Back: Cabosse 72% Dark Chocolate (¥68) with raspberry ganache and chocolate crumble.

The execution of dishes is perfectly fine, but I’m not convinced. It’s traditional French, but also boring French. And I understand having flammkuchen on the menu highlights the chef’s heritage, but it feels misplaced. Plus, dishes seem expensive for what they are. In the end, I chalk it up to personal preference—it’s not my thing, as I lean towards countryside French cooking.

I would recommend to try the express lunch first, then decide whether you want to go for dinner. Express Lunch is ¥158 for two courses, one appetizer and one main or ¥188 for three courses.