Here are three cheap Chinese restaurants in Shanghai. Featuring a decade-old cheungfun shop, a new Cantonese barbecue restaurant called Tak Lung Siu Mei, and a fast-paced noodle joint called Xun.


Chi Zi Ji 香港池仔记肠粉王

Address: 150-1 Xiangyang Nan Lu, near Nanchang Lu襄阳南路150-1号, 近南昌路
Tel: 64338308
Hours: 10:30am-10:30pm

Chi Zi Ji, a decade-old cheungfun Hong Kong style noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Hong Kong Pond Embryo King sounds a bit much. Let’s stick with Chi Zi Ji.

Chi Zi Ji has been operating on Xiangyang Nan Lu since 2008. The specialty here is cheungfun or changfen, Cantonese steamed rice noodles. It’s a typical dim sum dish, but it’s also as much a staple as any bowl of noodles in the south of China and in other parts of Southeast Asia.

On the menu are a dozen cheungfun options wrapped with everything from shrimp to corn and BBQ pork, a number of congees and rice dishes, deep-fried snacks, and stir-fry. The menu is both in English and Chinese.

Chi Zi Ji, a decade-old cheungfun Hong Kong style noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

Lunchtime at the restaurant is chaotic. It’s more war zone than eatery.

Peak hour sees a perpetual line of people waiting for tables and for takeout, laminated picture menus strewn across the cashier counter or being passed to the back of the line. Whole families, tourists, office workers, and grandmas with elbows of steel huddle in the center of the cramped shop and rush for any open seat like a survival game of musical chairs. Tickets in hand, patrons wait expectantly for their plates of slippery noodles.

Chi Zi Ji, a decade-old cheungfun Hong Kong style noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

The cheungfun are pretty good. I say that modestly: I do not think it the most amazing plate I’ve ever had, but it’s pretty good.

Skip the rice dishes, though. Sustenance is about all they provide.

Chi Zi Ji, a decade-old cheungfun Hong Kong style noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
Steamed Rice with Cured Meat (¥35) – meh.

It is currently ranked #7 on Dianping’s “Hot Cantonese Restaurants in Xuhui” list. Alipay and cash only, no WeChat Pay. It’s also available via delivery on Ele.me, searching for “池仔记”.


Tak Lung Siu Mei 龙烧

Address: 422-423, 4/F, East Block, Raffles City Changning, 1195 Changning Lu, near Kaixuan Lu长宁路1195号, 长宁来福寺广场4楼东区422-423, 近凯旋路
Tel: 63159555
Hours: 11am-10pm

Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

FCC Group (Sense 8, The Peacock Room) has just opened Tak Lung Siu Mei, a fast casual Cantonese restaurant that specializes in roasts and barbecue in the Raffles Changning mall.

To ensure the authenticity of their Cantonese barbecue, they’ve employed a master chef with 20 years of roasting experience in Hong Kong.

The result is fabulous.

Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

For people working in the offices directly above, it’s a godsend. Most of the barbecue comes with option for rice or noodles, priced at ¥48 to ¥78.

No English menus. So here are picture descriptions with the Chinese names for reference to help you order:

Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
叉烧烧鸭饭 (¥58)
Barbecue pork and roast duck rice
Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
玫瑰豉油鸡 (¥36/a la carte, ¥48/with rice)
Rose and soy sauce marinated roasted chicken, served with young ginger and scallion oil to dip.
Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
佛山鸭脚扎 (¥36)
This dish is rather uncommon. It’s a duck leg with red sausage, barbecue pork, and tripe, bound together with duck intestines.
Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
得龙蜜汁叉烧 (¥36/a la carte, ¥48/with rice)
Barbecue pork
Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
香醋菠菜苗 (¥18)
Spinach in light vinegar and soya sauce
Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
卤水拼盘 (¥68)
Braised mixed plate—tripe, tongue, intestines, and hard boiled egg.
Tak Lung Siu Mei, a Cantonese restaurant specializing in roasts and barbecue in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.
明炉靓烧鸭 (¥36/single portion, ¥98/half duck)
Roast duck

I would go out of my way to eat here, but seeing as it’s available on Ele.me, it is likely I’ll do delivery instead.

Favorites: Barbecue pork, roast duck, roast chicken, tripe.


Xun Noodles 虞面斋常熟野蕈

Address: 691 Beijing Xi Lu, near Shimen Er Lu 北京西路691号, 近石门二路
Tel: 62723963
Hours: 10:30am-3pm, 5pm-8:30pm

Xun Noodles, a local noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

Xun Noodles is a fairly new noodle shop specializing in Shanghainese fare. It opened in May, and it’s very popular.

The signature is the crab roe and shrimp noodles 蟹粉虾仁面 (¥78). These extra thin gummy noodles come drenched in crab roe and peeled shrimp, a few strands of young ginger as garnish. Crab roe noodles are quite popular. How do these fare? Pretty tasty, but not mind-blowing and not cheap.

Opt instead for the plain soup noodles 人面 (¥12) and a fried pork chop 生煎大排 (¥17).

Xun Noodles, a local noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

If you were looking for an affordable lunch option in the area, this would be it. Local noodle restaurants in Shanghai are a dime a dozen, but this one is very clean. It’s not really something I’d go out of the way for (again), but at least the noodles are good and I can enjoy them in a clean, air-conditioned space.

Xun Noodles, a local noodle shop in Shanghai. Photo by Rachel Gouk.

Menus only in Chinese. Here’s a workaround: Dianping and order by the photos.